Genesis 5020

My Story for His Glory

From Heaven to Earth: Living as a Spiritual Highlander September 30, 2015

Filed under: Book Reviews — Melissa Finnegan @ 3:56 pm
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FromHeaventoEarth

ABOUT THE BOOK: (192 pages)

Every Christian has received a divine inheritance—access to a life beyond anything they could ever imagine! As God continues to pour out His Spirit through dreams, visions and supernatural encounters, you will quickly discover these are all glorious invitations for you to enjoy eternal life… starting today!

Don’t just wait to experience Heaven in the afterlife. Know your identity and inheritance as a citizen of God’s supernatural Kingdom and start living this divine quality of life right now.

Prophetic evangelist, Adam Thompson shows you how to:

  • Become more sensitive to the Holy Spirit’s voice and hear Him more clearly
  • Discern the influence of angels in dreams, visions and divine encounters
  • Activate your dreams and visions through faith, bringing the invisible into reality
  • Experience greater intimacy with God by knowing your New Covenant identity
  • Make evangelism easy through dream interpretation

 

Live from Heaven to Earth and start unlocking the fullness of God’s supernatural inheritance in your life so you can become a world-changer wherever you go!

 

AdamThompsonABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Adam Thompson has a remarkable grace to interpret dreams, move in the word of knowledge and demonstrate the prophetic. Supernatural signs and manifestations regularly accompany his ministry as he desires to see Jesus ‘magnified’ through the moving of the Holy Spirit. He has ministered extensively in Pakistan, India, Africa, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Malaysia and the Philippines in crusades, feeding programs and pastors conferences. He is co-author of ‘The Divinity Code’ and operates itinerantly through his ministry ‘Voice of Fire’. –www.voiceoffireministries.org.

 

 

My thought:

This book speaks a lot of truths. Most of them I think the Church is missing out on.

I remember my first spiritual encounter with Jesus and it took place on a mountain top. I never gave that much thought until I read this book but now I see that experience very different in light of this book.

Some things said in this book really opened my eyes to deeper understanding. For example on p. 98 the author is talking about Mark 11:23, this is the passage about moving a mountain and casting it into the sea. He offered a new perspective on the verse. He said the mountain could mean heaven and we can pray and move heaven to earth (the sea). That gave me something to think about.

I loved this sentence on page 114, “The crux of living as a highlander is to be in constant communion with God out of the realms of heavenly places through an intimate relationship with Him. “Amen! It’s all about being in His presence.

Overall, this book will give you some things to pray and ponder. If you are looking to go to new places in your relationship with God this book might point you in that direction.

Grab your copy at your local bookstore, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Christianbook.com, Books-A-Million, Deeper Shopping or your favorite retailer.

A copy of this book was given to me in exchange for an honest review. 

 

Review and Giveaway: The Bones Will Speak by Carrie Stuart Parks September 28, 2015

Filed under: Book Reviews,Monday Musings — Melissa Finnegan @ 3:56 pm
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This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
The Bones Will Speak
Thomas Nelson (August 11, 2015)
by
Carrie Stuart Parks

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Carrie Stuart Parks is an award-winning fine artist and internationally known forensic artist. Along with her husband, Rick, she travels across the US and Canada teaching courses in forensic art to law enforcement as well as civilian participants. She has won numerous awards for career excellence. Carrie is a popular platform speaker, presenting a variety of topics from crime to creativity.

Animals have always been a large part of her life. Her parents, Ned and Evelyn Stuart, started Skeel Kennel Great Pyrenees in 1960. Carrie inherited the kennel and continues with her beloved dogs as both an AKC judge and former president of the Great Pyrenees Club of America. She lives on the same ranch she grew up on in Northern Idaho.

ABOUT THE BOOK

A killer with a penchant for torture has taken notice of forensic expert Gwen Marcey . . . and her daughter.
When Gwen Marcey’s dog comes home with a human skull and then leads her to a cabin in the woods near her Montana home, she realizes there’s a serial killer in her community. And when she finds a tortured young girl clinging to life on the cabin floor, she knows this killer is a lunatic.

Yet what unsettles Gwen most is that the victim looks uncannily like her daughter.
The search for the torturer leads back in time to a neo-Nazi bombing in Washington state—a bombing with only one connection to Montana: Gwen. The group has a race-not-grace model of salvation . . . and they’ve marked Gwen as a race traitor.
When it becomes clear that the killer has a score to settle, Gwen finds herself in a battle against time. She will have to use all of her forensic skills to find the killer before he can carry out his threat to destroy her—and the only family she has left.

If you would like to read the first chapter of The Bones Will Speak, go HERE.

 

My thoughts and giveaway:

Wow. What a fast-paced adventure this book is. I haven’t had the chance to read anything by Carrie until now and I have to say I think I will be reading more of her work.

I don’t know if I have ever read a book that surprised me at the end. The person I thought was doing the murders had me guessing then being wrong, then guessing again and being wrong again. She did a great job making a few people be the possible suspect.

I found the whole book fascinating, the characters and the story-line. The motivation behind the murders was something I never think too much about but I am sure still exists in the U.S.

If you like suspense that is very visual this is a book for you. I read this book very fast because it couldn’t put it down.

Leave a comment by October 5th for your chance to win a copy. One winner will be chosen by random.org. (U.S. addresses only. I am not responsible for books lost or damaged in the mail)

A copy of this book was given to my by the publisher through the Christian Fiction Blog Alliance in exchange for an honest review. 

 

Good Good Father September 25, 2015

Filed under: Cool videos — Melissa Finnegan @ 12:55 pm
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By kazu end

By kazu end

I wanted to share a song with you today that I often find myself singing because it’s just so true and something we need to cling to even when our world around us seems so uncertain.

We are loved by God…it’s who we are 🙂

Click here and worship.

 

Hot Mama: 12 Secrets To A Sizzling Hot Marriage September 24, 2015

Filed under: Book Reviews — Melissa Finnegan @ 10:35 am
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hot mama

About:

“These hot mamas tell you how you can stop feeling ‘whatever’ about sex and start feeling ‘woo-hoo!'”–Sheila Wray Gregoire, author of The Good Girl’s Guide to Great Sex

It’s easy for us moms to slip into the habit of letting the craziness of our days interfere with our relationships with our husbands. We simply don’t have the energy or the ideas for a spicy, satisfying sex life. We’re usually just amazed we made it to the end of the day without collapsing or throttling someone.

Hot Mama to the rescue!

In this witty book, hot mamas Kathi Lipp and Erin MacPherson share hilarious stories and creative ideas from moms everywhere to help you build a relationship with your spouse that’s happy, healthy, and fun. From building confidence and banishing guilt to flirting (remember that?) and wearing clothes that get you–and him–in the mood, Kathi and Erin show you how to take your sex life from ho-hum to sizzling hot.

Kathi Lipp is the author of Praying God’s Word for Your Husband, The Husband Project, and I Need Some Help Here! She is a conference and retreat speaker who reaches thousands of women each year and has been a guest on numerous national radio programs, including Focus on the Family. She and her husband have four children and live in California. Learn more at http://www.kathilipp.com.

Erin MacPherson
is a wife, mom, speaker, and writer. She is a staff writer and editor for a number of major online parenting and educational publications, including Nickelodeon and Dun & Bradstreet. Her popular blog, ChristianMamasGuide.com, offers women godly, tell-it-like-it-is advice and information. She and her husband have three children and live in Texas.

My thoughts:

The tone of this book is light and fun. The two authors have a great style that will put you at ease as you read.

This book is full of helpful hints and truths that can add a little spice to your marriage. It will take effort but if you want your marriage to change then you need to put forth the effort.

Each chapter ends with a pledge for us to make to take steps to change. Then real woman share how they have put some of these practices in to practice and the positive results they’ve had.

I will say there wasn’t a lot of new information for me, but it was a good refresher and a reminder of the importance of putting my husband first.

If you struggle with intimacy in your marriage this book might give you some new ideas of how to add a little spice to your life.

Visit Kathi here.

Visit Erin here.

Grab your copy at your local bookstore, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Christianbook.com, Books-A-Million, Deeper Shopping or your favorite retailer.

A copy of this book was given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

 

Write to the Point with Ann Lee Miller September 23, 2015

Filed under: Author Interviews — Melissa Finnegan @ 10:38 am
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ann

Today we get write to the point with Ann Lee Miller. Her newest book touches on a very hot topic. I haven’t had the chance to read her book but I have read the first chapter and that alone was enough to know this book wouldn’t be a fluffy read. The reality is we live in a world that needs to look at these tough issues and see the brokenness underneath and respond as Christ would. 

Today she shares about her own relationship with her dad, may you be touched and encouraged by her words.

Bio:
Ann Lee Miller earned a BA in creative writing from Ashland (OH) University and writes full-time in Phoenix, but left her heart in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, where she grew up. When she isn’t blogging memoir at AnnLeeMiller.com or muddling through some crisis—real or imagined—you’ll find her hiking in the Superstition Mountains with her husband or meddling in her kids’ lives. Over 100,000 copies of her debut novel Kicking Eternity, have been downloaded from Amazon.

Forgiving Dad

 

I stood in a slice of sun and dust motes coming through a gap in the storage barn while Dad rooted through our pre-boat life.

Dad barked at me to help him look for the box labeled “memorabilia.” He hunted the April, 1953 Athletic Journal that contained a four-page pictorial spread of him doing the backstroke for an article by swimming great Doc Counsilman.

I smarted from his tone of voice as I climbed over R.J.’s old crib that Mom held onto hopes of filling with a new baby.

Twelve years of Dad’s barbed words and disappointed sighs stuffed inside me like our possessions packed into the horse stall. Some of Dad’s slights were small like the green, blue, and brown antique bottles he salvaged from mangrove swamps, now tucked in dust-covered liquor boxes. Some were big like the dining room table with the broken base we’d propped up with a cement block.

I hefted aside the glass case that held Dad’s swimming medals. My knuckles brushed dust from the footboard of my parents’ bed, and I was six again, hanging upside down, letting my hair flop over the end of the mattress, contemplating a Dr. Seuss inverted world. I scrambled across the rumpled bedding to peer over the edge where Dad leaned against the headboard, reading the newspaper.

He smelled like Ivory soap.

Sunshine streamed through the open windows and glanced off the terrazzo floor, happy like I felt inside.

But Dad had run out of patience with my antics. He told me to quit trying to peek under the sheet at his birthday suit.

I squawked in protest. I didn’t even know he wasn’t dressed. And besides, my baby brother’s pee-shooting sack of extra flesh had satisfied all my curiosity about male anatomy.

But I could tell by his expression he didn’t believe me.

I slid boneless from the bed and slunk from the room.

I packed the emotional relic back into its cardboard box and shoved it into a corner of my soul with the rest of the things I didn’t want to think about.

Five years later when I was seventeen, Dad would stop me on the front stoop of our house in New Smyrna Beach—the step where I’d ducked out of more good-night kisses than I’d stood still for.

Dad must have sensed the Clampett collection of complaints I’d piled between us. “You hate me, don’t you?”

Of course, I didn’t hate him. He was being dramatic. But I didn’t particularly like him, either.

That year I chose Janis Ian’s At Seventeen—a song about an ugly, ignored girl—to play as I was presented on the homecoming court. A weird choice for a girl just voted attractive and popular by her classmates. But the song was true underneath my skin. Dad had written it there when I was six.

At twenty-two I scribbled a short story on loose leaf as Jim, my fiancé of ten months, studied across the living room of Fern’s boarding house where he lived.

“Write what you know,” my professor had said.

I knew… Dad and a hodgepodge of hurts.

I glanced at Jim. We thought we knew everything about each other, but Jim had never met Dad. I’d told him things that didn’t matter. Dad held a BS in business. He built a sluice box to pan for gold out West the year I was five. He made wine in the bathtub from grapefruit Hurricane Betsy knocked down.

I heaved in a breath and read aloud the bitterness I’d bled in ball point ink. Then I told the stories that hurt my throat to tell.

Jim waded through the flapped open boxes of my life and sat down, sliding an arm around me. “You hate your Dad.” The words echoed Dad’s on the stoop.

“I strongly resent him.”

“You need to forgive.”

I looked at Jim, incredulous. “Didn’t you hear anything I said? He doesn’t deserve my forgiveness.”

Jim covered my hand with his. “The forgiveness is for you.”

I tore my gaze from the compassion in his eyes “I can’t. It’s too hard.”

Jim’s voice was gentle, probing. “Do you believe God is strong enough to help?”

I surveyed the wreckage littering Fern’s Persian rug and sensed the dead calm I’d felt in the eye of Hurricane Betsy.

Bible words wafted to me, nothing is impossible with God.

I scanned Fern’s delicate old lamps and figurines that peered at me from the edges of the room. “I guess if He wanted to, He could use some of His power to help me forgive Dad.” But I wasn’t sure I wanted to let Dad off the hook.

“Good. Let’s pray.” Jim gripped my hand tighter, hope in his eyes.

“Now?” It took me six months to decide to get a haircut and Jim expected me to forgive Dad two minutes after the idea materialized?

“Yeah.” Jim’s arm felt heavy on my shoulders like his will pressing down on me.

But Jim was the one person who loved me unconditionally, who’d given me a picture of how God loved me. Neither of them would do anything to hurt me.

“Okay. Fine.” I dropped my chin to my chest, my hand still wrapped in Jim’s larger one.

His prayer splashed over me in a gentle rain of encouragement, and it was over way too soon.

I wondered where Fern and Jim’s housemates had gone. Were there any Hawkins Market cream sticks on the kitchen table?

I inhaled a breath for fortification. “I believe You can do anything. If You want to—help me forgive Dad.”

My eyes popped open. The anger sucked out of me as though through a divine vacuum cleaner. I felt… free. In its place something new sprouted. For the first time, I wanted to see Dad.

That was the day Dad started his bicycle trek from California to Ohio for my wedding—sleeping in graveyards along the way.

Three months later, I walked into my Aunt Barb’s house in Canton, Ohio, and gripped Dad’s bony shoulders in an awkward hug. The faint, familiar scent of BO clung to him.

He shook Jim’s hand as the room buzzed with relatives. And before the evening was over, Dad volleyed me a criticism.

Acid poured into my stomach, my body stiffened, bracing for the plunge and twist of Dad’s emotional knife.

But his negative words melted off me, pooling at my feet. Not even a flesh wound, Monte Python said in my head. And Dad’s words never again pierced me.

Far from lily white, I’m not proud of spending my adult life stiff-arming Dad from coming closer—as though God weren’t up to protecting me after all He’d done. I got in digs when I could.

But after the boat years, after my parents’ divorce, Dad kept coming back—every year of my life. He found me in Florida—Coconut Grove, Stuart, New Smyrna Beach, Ormond Beach, Lakeland, and Deland—Ashland, Ohio, Indianapolis, and Phoenix. He persisted, pursuing relationship with me when I wanted to give up. It was his steadfastness that told me he loved me.

And when liver cancer yellowed his skin and the whites of his eyes, he came home to die with me.

I rode away from the storage barn on that Miami winter day in 1970 in our two-toned Plymouth Valliant. In my lap, I cradled Dad’s past and my future God would heal.

Chasing Happy Back cover:

After an epic fail in the hetero world, Ash Jackson heads cross country to Arizona to figure out his bisexuality and make peaceChasingHappyFinal with himself and God.

Nashville Star Samma Templeton’s music career bankrolls her future husband’s political campaigns. But she throws up before every concert and feels relegated to an item on the senator’s calendar.

When Ash moves into Samma’s apartment building their childhood friendship resurrects, and Samma must choose between promoting a political agenda that will benefit millions or following her heart. Ash must face his inner demons for the girl who was his past and feels like his future.

Thanks so much for sharing with my readers, Ann. I pray God will continue to bless your writing journey. 

 

Only With Blood by Therese Down September 21, 2015

Filed under: Book Reviews,Monday Musings — Melissa Finnegan @ 10:44 am
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only with blood

About:

Jack Flynn, strong and aggressive but slowly dying of tuberculosis on his farm in Tipperary in the Republic of Ireland, decides to acquire–purchase–a young wife who can bear him sons to inherit his family’s land. His choice, Caitlin Spillane, is less than half his age, attractive and intelligent, and resents bitterly the obedience that is forced upon her.

When a young firebrand, a supporter of the IRA, arrives in the village, he and Caitlin are drawn together in their detestation of Flynn. Flynn, traumatized by his own insurgent IRA experiences twenty years earlier, is secretly convinced that Eamonn de Valera’s more diplomatic, peaceful approach to Ireland’s problems is the only sane one.

Could Caitlin be won for the cause, and leave her unloved husband?

A novel set against the struggle for the heart of Ireland in the Second World War, when the IRA notoriously sought assistance from the Nazis, Only with Blood explores flawed characters placed in extraordinary situations.

My thoughts:

I don’t know if I have ever read a book that I was so back and forth about. There were times I was very into the story and others times I wanted to just skip over parts.

Mostly I really enjoyed the part of the story about Caitlin and Jack.

Jack really had my heart. He really isn’t a bad guy but most people can’t see the good in him because they don’t know him. Caitlin included. I felt really sorry for Jack and wanted him to have a happy ending.

The history about Donal was a bit long for me. I had trouble connecting with that part of the story until it collided with Caitlin and Jack’s part of the story.

But at the end I sat back and said, “Wow.” Something Jack says at the end almost mad me cry. I can’t tell you what he said but once you get there you will be glad you read the whole book. Such a rich parallel we can draw to Jesus.

Also, totally loved that my last name shows up in the book and my daughter’s first name is used as a last name, O’Meara (but no “O” in her name).

Just a heads up, there is language in this book. I would say this is a loosely Christian book, so if you are offended by some words this might not be the book for you.

Grab your copy at your local bookstore, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Christianbook.com, Books-A-Million, Deeper Shopping or your favorite retailer.

A copy of this book was given to me in exchange for an honest review. 

 

Eve by WM. Paul Young September 17, 2015

Filed under: Book Reviews — Melissa Finnegan @ 4:08 pm
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eve

About:

The Shack shattered our limited perceptions about God. Eve will destroy harmful misconceptions about ourselves.

From the author of the 25-million copy bestseller The Shack comes a captivating new novel destined to be one of the most important and talked-about books of the decade.

When a shipping container washes ashore on an island between our world and the next, John the Collector finds a young woman inside—broken, frozen, and barely alive. With the aid of Healers and Scholars, John oversees her recovery and soon discovers her genetic code connects her to every known human race. She is a girl of prophecy and no one can guess what her survival will mean…

No one but Eve, Mother of the Living, who calls her “daughter,” and invites her to witness the truth about her story—indeed, the truth about us all.

Eve is a bold, unprecedented exploration of the Creation narrative, true to the original texts and centuries of scholarship—yet with breathtaking discoveries that challenge traditional misconceptions about who we are and how we’re made. As The Shack awakened readers to a personal, non-religious understanding of God, Eve will free us from faulty interpretations that have corrupted human relationships since the Garden of Eden.

Eve opens a refreshing conversation about the equality of men and women within the context of our beginnings, helping us see each other as our Creator does—complete, unique, and not constrained to cultural rules or limitations.

Thoroughly researched and exquisitely written, Eve is a masterpiece that will inspire readers for generations to come.

My thoughts:

I know a lot of people took issue with The Shack and even though I didn’t agree with everything in the book I found it very interesting and deeply moving.

When I saw WM. has come out with a new book, Eve, I had to read it to see what he came up with this time.

The first couple of chapters I really wasn’t sure if I would finish the book. My mind seemed to have no place to land and I couldn’t get a hold of the story. But I pressed on.

I am so glad I did.

This book touches such a deep place in the heart of man and why we have turned away from our one true love.

Lilly is a tough cookie, but she is so broken like all of us until she sees the beauty that is awaiting her. And she learns to trust. This is key.

My words really can’t do justice to this book. It goes far beyond a review, it has moved my heart and I am still pondering the words I read.

With that being said, there were some things in the book that made me go, “Not sure I think that really happened.” But it is fiction and should be read as such. Also, there was at least one “D” word in there and I am pretty sure Lilly used the Lord’s name in vain. So I wanted to give you a heads up on that.

But if you want a different and deeper understanding of the heart of man and woman from the beginning I believe you will find it within these pages. Soul-achingly beautiful.

Visit WM. here.

Grab your copy at your local bookstore, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Books-A-Million, Deeper Shopping or your favorite retailer.

A copy of this book was given to me by the publisher through Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.